Calendar

Dec
1
Tue
CFP Deadline – Mass Incarceration – Virtual Symposium
Dec 1 all-day
CFP Deadline - Mass Incarceration – Virtual Symposium

The Idaho Law Review at the University of Idaho College of Law invites proposals for its annual symposium, to be held virtually in 2021 (March or April), on the topic of Mass Incarceration. Proposals are due by December 1, 2020. Please see the Call for Proposals for additional details.

CFP Deadline: ACS 6th Annual Constitutional Law Scholars Forum
Dec 1 all-day
CFP Deadline: ACS 6th Annual Constitutional Law Scholars Forum

The American Constitution Society of Law and Policy, Barry University Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law ACS Student Chapter & Law Review, and Texas A&M University of Law invite scholarly proposals on any constitutional law topic for the Sixth Annual Constitutional Law Scholars Forum. Proposals are due by December 1, 2020. The conference will be held on March 26, 2021 at Barry University Dwayne O. Andreas School of Law in Orlando, Florida.

Please see the Call for Papers for additional details and submission information.

CFP Deadline: Misinformation/Disinformation and the Law
Dec 1 all-day
CFP Deadline: Misinformation/Disinformation and the Law

The Center for International and Comparative Law (CICL) at Saint Louis University and the Saint Louis University Law Journal invite abstract proposals for a special issue on misinformation/disinformation and the law.

The avenues for misinformation (the dissemination of inaccurate content, irrespective of intent) and disinformation (the deliberate spread of inaccurate information with the purpose of misleading others) have increased dramatically in recent years, in both online and offline environments.

We are seeking proposals for articles that help map out the heterogeneity of misinformation and disinformation, and in particular its salience in the legal and regulatory space, as well as possible solutions to ongoing manifestations of misinformation/disinformation. We are looking for contributions focusing on different areas of misinformation/disinformation (e.g. health, environmental, financial, religious, political, online, offline). Work on jurisdictions or regions outside of the U.S. is welcome. Likewise, as long as there is a connection to a legal dimension of a misinformation/disinformation problem, we welcome submissions from across disciplines and professions, from legal scholars and those outside of law alike.

Abstracts should not exceed 500 words. We welcome proposals for articles between 2,500 and 6,000 words. Submissions should be sent via email to the Center for International and Comparative Law (cicl@slu.edu) by December 1, 2020. Decisions will be communicated on December 15, 2020. Accepted papers will be due on June 15, 2021.

CFP: U.S. Consumer Financial Services Law Writing Competition
Dec 1 all-day
CFP: U.S. Consumer Financial Services Law Writing Competition

The American College of Consumer Financial Services Lawyers is hosting its 2021 annual writing competition on topics regarding U.S. Consumer Financial Services Law. Entries must have been written or published between November 15, 2019 and December 1, 2020 with the deadline for submissions in the competition being December 1, 2020. Please see the Call for Papers for more details.

Dec
3
Thu
Virtual Conference: Criminal Defending
Dec 3 – Dec 4 all-day
Dec
8
Tue
Public Law and Inequality Conference – Canberra, Australia
Dec 8 – Dec 9 all-day
Public Law and Inequality Conference - Canberra, Australia

To mark the 60th Anniversary of ANU Law and the 30th anniversary of the Centre for International and Public Law (CIPL), a major public law conference will be held at the Australian National University in Canberra, on 8-9 December 2020.

Growing inequality is a defining challenge of our times, domestically and globally. Yet the role of inequality in social, political and economic life is often muted (sometimes, invisible) in much public law scholarship. Notably, public law’s foundational concepts were forged in a social world where the inevitability of inequality was often taken for granted. The stuttering processes of democratization have rendered that assumption untenable.

However, although public law scholarship has considered how the field can contribute to political equality, there has been less focus, particularly in recent decades, on the relationship between public law and material equality. The question of whether equality is achievable in a world of yawning disparities in wealth can no longer be brushed aside.

How do public law concepts, institutions and norms frame or contribute to political and material inequality? How can public law and public law scholarship contribute to clear thinking about the set of problems associated with pervasive inequity in contemporary society?

We invite papers addressing these and similar themes along a variety of dimensions (e.g. gender), from a number of perspectives (e.g. the experience of Indigenous Peoples) and across multiple disciplines. The conference will be of broad interest to constitutional and administrative law scholars, including those whose work focuses on history and theory of public law or its broader role in social, political, economic and cultural life. Abstracts are due March 2, 2020.

For more information, including the full call for papers, visit the Conference website.

Dec
15
Tue
CFP Deadline: Asian Legal History @ Hue University
Dec 15 all-day
CFP Deadline: Asian Legal History @ Hue University

The Centre for Comparative and Transnational Law (CCTL) Transnational Legal History Group of the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) LAW and the University of Law, Hue University are hosting the Asian Legal History Conference on July 24-25, 2021 at Hue University.

Proposals for papers and panels are invited. Submissions on any subject, providing it pertains to legal history in Asia, will be considered. Abstracts are due December 15, 2020. Please see the conference website for details.

CFP Deadline: Chicago-Kent College of Law/Roy C. Palmer Civil Liberties Prize
Dec 15 all-day
CFP Deadline: Chicago-Kent College of Law/Roy C. Palmer Civil Liberties Prize

Entries are now being accepted for the Chicago-Kent College of Law/Roy C. Palmer Civil Liberties Prize.

Entries will be accepted through December 15, 2020.

Established in 2007 at Chicago-Kent College of Law by the late Roy C. Palmer ’62 and his wife, Susan M. Palmer, the prize honors a work of scholarship that explores the tension between civil liberties and national security in contemporary American society. The $10,000 prize is designed to encourage and reward public debate among scholars on current issues affecting the rights of individuals and the responsibilities of governments throughout the world.

Articles or books submitted to the competition must be in draft form or have been published within one year prior to the December 15 deadline. As a condition of accepting the award, the winner will present his or her work at Chicago-Kent. All reasonable expenses will be paid. (Download a printable copy of the call for entries.)

Eligible books and articles should be submitted to Tasha Kincade, executive assistant to Dean Anita K. Krug, at tkincade@kentlaw.iit.edu or Chicago-Kent College of Law, 565 West Adams Street, Chicago, IL 60661-3691.

CFP: 2021 UNC Tax Symposium
Dec 15 all-day
CFP: 2021 UNC Tax Symposium

The University of North Carolina Tax Center and the KPMG Foundation are accepting papers for its twenty-fourth annual Tax Symposium. The deadline for submissions is December 15, 2020.

For additional information, please see the Call for Papers.

Dec
20
Sun
CFP Deadline: Library Science – Athens
Dec 20 all-day
CFP Deadline: Library Science - Athens

QQML2021, the 13th Qualitative and Quantitative Methods in Libraries International Conference, will take place May 25-28, 2021, in a hybrid format. The deadline for abstract submissions is Dec. 20, 2020. Please see the conference website for details.

Jan
4
Mon
CFP: 2021 Junior Scholars Conference
Jan 4 all-day
CFP: 2021 Junior Scholars Conference

The University of Michigan Law School invites paper submissions for its 2021 Junior Law Scholars Conference on April 16-17, 2021. Abstracts must be submitted by January 4, 2021.

For additional information, please see the Call for Papers.

Jan
5
Tue
The Power of Supply Chains – AALS 2021 – San Francisco, CA
Jan 5 – Jan 9 all-day
The Power of Supply Chains - AALS 2021 - San Francisco, CA

Anita Ramasastry (University of Washington), David Snyder (American University) and
Jonathan Lipson (Temple) have put together an “open source” program, “The Power of Supply
Chains,” to be held as part of the AALS annual meeting (Jan 5-9, 2021).

The program will focus on legal questions raised by supply chains and supply chain agreements. The study of supply chains crosses doctrinal fields, including those set forth on the Appendix to this Call for Papers. We are especially interested in the role that they can play in addressing human rights, environmental and other social and economic goals, as well as the effect that COVID has had on them.

Abstracts must be submitted to David Snyder (dsnyder@wcl.american.edu) by September 17, 2020.

More information and suggested topics are available in the Call for Papers.

Jan
6
Wed
CFP Deadline: 2021 Semiotics of Law
Jan 6 all-day
CFP Deadline: 2021 Semiotics of Law

The 23rd International Roundtables for the Semiotics of Law will take place May 27-29, 2021 in Rome, Italy on the topic Global Semiotics and Everyday Legal Claims: Intercultural Use of Law, Interreligious Dialogue and Translation Ethics. Proposals are due by Jan. 6, 2021. 

See flyer for details.

The relationship between legal rules and the spaces where they become effective is gradually
morphing. This change is precipitated by semantic or cognitive—rather than exclusively political—
circumstances. The meaning of legal rules is continually challenged by the transformation of their
spatial projections and their cultural coordinates. Law can no longer assume that discrete spatial
circuits and corresponding cultural backgrounds coincide. Conversely, each territorial frame,
sometimes even those that are most distant from metropolitan areas, can function (at least potentially)
as a hub of innumerous threads of actions and interests. All these connections impinge on the
significance of legal rules and, especially, the prognosis for their effectiveness. The daily life of law
is affected by this spatial-semantic turmoil.

The present law’s dynamic involves the conflation of different spatial and semantic frames merging
reciprocal ‘elsewheres’ and giving social phenomena and the consequences of their legal regulation
a kind of ubiquity—at least in potential terms. This means that the understanding of what is ‘here’
and ‘now’ is to be unmoored by any reification or thinghood attached to empirical events, objects,
situations, etc. On the contrary, to grasp their ‘real’ phenomenality, namely what they are, and the
consequences of the application of one legal rule rather than another, each of them is to be considered as a sign. A semiotic gaze allows the remolding of the meaningful connections underlying what we call ‘things’ and ‘events’ so as to readjust them in tune with the new scale of spatial implications between the multi-sited and worldwide determinants of what happens and is to be ruled in each ‘here.’

The inter-penetrations between multiple ‘elsewheres’ require a global semiotic understanding that makes the legal interpreter (and even the lawmakers) cognizant of the semantic and spatial web
underlying any ‘fact’ to be ruled. The ability to grasp what the threads of meaning comprising what
is perceived as a ‘fact’ is also a prerequisite to envisage the consequences of the application of each
legal rule and thereby the legitimacy of the way to apply each rule with regard to its prerequisites of
legitimation. All this implies an effort to translate the ‘other’ spaces of experience implied in the
understanding of the ‘present facts’ to be ruled, and then the intercultural translation between different
circuits of experience which this understanding involves. Furthermore, insofar as culture enshrines
the anthropological and historical projections of the religious horizons of meaning, any attempt to
give course to intercultural translations implies and intersects with the promotion of interreligious
dialogue. The anthropological schemas rooted in religious imageries, on the other hand, mold even
the secularized spaces of experiences and the related categorical schemas that people use to define
them. Spatial and semantic Otherness, from this point of view, is therefore to be translated as an
ingredient already entailed in the production of the present and daily experience of people. In this
sense and beyond any identitarian reification of culture, the ability to realize the semantic and
pragmatic closeness of what is physically remote can be consistently enhanced by assuming
experiential elements as signs and their reconfiguration/aggregation in new categorical frames.
The aim of the conference is to put together semioticians, anthropologists, geographers, law theorists
and legal practitioners (experts in civil law, business law, family law, international law, legal
anthropology, etc.) to show how the semiotic approach can function as a powerful support to face the
present challenges of legal experience and transform legal practices in an outpost of a bottom-up and
emancipatory intercultural use of law.

In line with the above, multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary proposals will be welcomed in the hope
that they can help to trigger a transdisciplinary collaboration aimed to give legal practitioners new
instruments to attune people’s experience with their renewed understanding of the real
spatial/semantic coordinates shaping the environment they live by.

Contributions are requested on—but not limited to—the following topics:
– Local actions, global meanings: the space threads and the legal relevance of facts.
– The embodiment of language and the worldwide spatialities of human rights
– Language and Spaces in Global and Contextualised Human Rights Discourse
– Justice for work: intercultural communications and the semiotics of worldwide economics
– Legal assistance and the ubiquitous omnipresent? connections of the legal subject
– Beyond the Anthropocene: the legal semiotics of ecological sustainability and human subjectivity
– Translating multi-dimensional/multi-sited ordinary life experiences and the intercultural semiotics
of rights
– Intercultural use of law and legal practitioners (lawyers, notaries, accountants)
– Against exotic legality: cultural difference as cognitive diffraction in daily legal experience

– Is the secularization of law a limit to the understanding of the interpenetration between religion and
cultures?
– Is it possible to envisage a legal intercultural secularization as a remedy to the cognitive/cultural
defectiveness of the idea of political ‘neutrality’ of institutions?
– Interreligious dialogue and semiosic translation as anthropological means of molding an
intercultural legal lexicon
– Intercultural use of law and semiosic translation/transaction beyond the
multiculturalism/interculturalism debate

Abstracts of 300 words (max.) should be submitted by January 6, 2021 to both Mario Ricca
(Organizer: mario.ricca@icloud.com) and Anne Wagner (valwagnerfr@yahoo.com) with
participation decisions made by January 20, 2021.

Selected papers will be invited for publication in a Special issue of the International Journal for the
Semiotics of Law (Springer: https://www.springer.com/journal/11196) and/or for inclusion in an
edited volume of the Law Book Series (Law and Visual Jurisprudence – Springer:
https://www.springer.com/series/16413).

Respecting the tradition, the roundtable languages will be English and French.

Jan
15
Fri
NYU Global Fellows Program 2021-2022
Jan 15 all-day
NYU Global Fellows Program 2021-2022

The New York University School of Law is inviting applications for the Global Fellows Program, the Emile Noël Fellowship Program, and the Visiting Doctoral Research Program for the 2021-2022 academic year. Materials must be received by Jan. 15, 2021 for the Global Fellows Program and the Emile Noël Fellowship Program. Materials must be received by Feb 15, 2021 for the Visiting Doctoral Researcher Program.

  • Global Research Fellows are tenured or tenure-track academics with a demonstrable background of strong legal scholarship. More senior academics (for example, faculty members tenured for ten years or more) may be designated as Senior Global Research Fellows at the discretion of the selection committee.
  • Global Fellows from Practice & Government are government officials, judges, officials from international organizations and lawyers in private practice who wish to take a semester or academic year away from their posts to engage in serious scholarship. More experienced officials and practitioners may be designated as Senior Global Fellows from Practice & Government at the discretion of the selection committee.
  • Post-Doctoral Global Fellows are post-doctoral scholars who have attained their doctoral degrees within the past four years and who have not yet secured a tenure-track academic appointment at an institution. Post-Doctoral Global Fellows meeting these eligibility requirements may be considered for a limited number of merit-based post-doctoral stipends, ranging from US$30,000 to US$45,000 for the academic year (or from US$15,000 to US$22,500 per academic semester), subject to applicable tax(es).
  • Global Emile Noël Research Fellows are post-doctoral or tenured academics with a demonstrable background of legal scholarship. More senior academics (for example, faculty members tenured for ten Years or more) at the discretion of the selection committee may be designated as Senior Global Emile Noël Research Fellows.
  • Global Emile Noël Fellowships are also open to government officials, judges, officials from international organizations and lawyers in private practice who wish to take a semester or academic year away from their posts to engage in serious scholarship.
  • Post-Doctoral Global Emile Noël Fellows are post-doctoral scholars who have attained their doctoral degrees within the past four years and who have not yet secured a tenure-track academic appointment at an institution. Post-Doctoral Global Emile Noël Fellows meeting these eligibility requirements may be considered for a limited number of merit-based post doctoral stipends, ranging from US$30,000 to US$45,000 for the academic year (or from US$15,000 to US$22,500 per academic semester), subject to applicable tax(es).
  • Visiting Doctoral Researchers are doctoral candidates enrolled in a doctoral degree program at another institution abroad who wish to benefit from spending one year of their research at NYU School of Law. They will be fully integrated into the JSD program as far as is relevant. The JSD program invites approximately five to six Visiting Doctoral Researchers each academic year to contribute to the Visiting Doctoral Researcher position.

For additional information, please see the Call for Applications.

Jan
28
Thu
Early-Stage Research Panel @ PEP Panel
Jan 28 – Jan 31 all-day
Early-Stage Research Panel @ PEP Panel

The Program on Economics & Privacy (PEP), part of the Law & Economics Center at George Mason University Antonin Scalia Law School invites applications for an early-stage research panel on the law and economics of digital information policy to be held January 28-31, 2021 in Naples, Florida. Proposals are due November 20, 2020. Please see the Call for Papers for details.

Feb
1
Mon
CFP Deadline: The Age of Human Rights Journal
Feb 1 all-day
CFP Deadline: The Age of Human Rights Journal

The Age of Human Rights Journal (TAHRJ) invites submissions for its June 2021 publication on the topic of Human Rights from Different Approaches. The deadline for submissions is February 1, 2021. Please see its submission webpage for more details.

Feb
10
Wed
CFP – Semiotic Perspectives on Environment, Forestry, Fishery, Hunting and Law
Feb 10 all-day
CFP - Semiotic Perspectives on Environment, Forestry, Fishery, Hunting and Law

The International Journal for the Semiotics of Law is accepting submissions for a special issue entitled “Semiotic Perspectives on Environment, Forestry, Fishery, Hunting and Law.” Abstracts are due by February 10, 2021.

For additional information, see the Call for Papers.

CFP Deadline: COVID-19 Infodemic
Feb 10 all-day
CFP Deadline: COVID-19 Infodemic

The International Journal for the Semiotics of Law (IJSL) and Comparative Legilinguistics invite submissions on the topic of COVID-19 Infodemic – Between Law, Ethics and Fake News. There will be two special issues for the International Journal for the Semiotics of Law and one special issue for the Comparative Legilinguistics journal. The deadline to submit an abstract is February 10, 2021. Please see the Call for Papers for more details.

Feb
15
Mon
NYU Global Fellows Program 2021-2022
Feb 15 all-day
NYU Global Fellows Program 2021-2022

The New York University School of Law is inviting applications for the Global Fellows Program, the Emile Noël Fellowship Program, and the Visiting Doctoral Research Program for the  2021-2022 academic year. Materials must be received by Jan. 15, 2021 for the Global Fellows Program and the Emile Noel Fellowship Program. Materials must be received by Feb 15, 2021 for the Visiting Doctoral Researcher Program.

  • Global Research Fellows are tenured or tenure-track academics with a demonstrable background of strong legal scholarship. More senior academics (for example, faculty members tenured for ten years or more) may be designated as Senior Global Research Fellows at the discretion of the selection committee.
  • Global Fellows from Practice & Government are government officials, judges, officials from international organizations and lawyers in private practice who wish to take a semester or academic year away from their posts to engage in serious scholarship. More experienced officials and practitioners may be designated as Senior Global Fellows from Practice & Government at the discretion of the selection committee.
  • Post-Doctoral Global Fellows are post-doctoral scholars who have attained their doctoral degrees within the past four years and who have not yet secured a tenure-track academic appointment at an institution. Post-Doctoral Global Fellows meeting these eligibility requirements may be considered for a limited number of merit-based post-doctoral stipends, ranging from US$30,000 to US$45,000 for the academic year (or from US$15,000 to US$22,500 per academic semester), subject to applicable tax(es).
  • Global Emile Noël Research Fellows are post-doctoral or tenured academics with a demonstrable background of legal scholarship. More senior academics (for example, faculty members tenured for ten Years or more) at the discretion of the selection committee may be designated as Senior Global Emile Noël Research Fellows.
  • Global Emile Noël Fellowships are also open to government officials, judges, officials from international organizations and lawyers in private practice who wish to take a semester or academic year away from their posts to engage in serious scholarship.
  • Post-Doctoral Global Emile Noël Fellows are post-doctoral scholars who have attained their doctoral degrees within the past four years and who have not yet secured a tenure-track academic appointment at an institution. Post-Doctoral Global Emile Noël Fellows meeting these eligibility requirements may be considered for a limited number of merit-based post doctoral stipends, ranging from US$30,000 to US$45,000 for the academic year (or from US$15,000 to US$22,500 per academic semester), subject to applicable tax(es).
  • Visiting Doctoral Researchers are doctoral candidates enrolled in a doctoral degree program at another institution abroad who wish to benefit from spending one year of their research at NYU School of Law. They will be fully integrated into the JSD program as far as is relevant. The JSD program invites approximately five to six Visiting Doctoral Researchers each academic year to contribute to the Visiting Doctoral Researcher position.

For additional information, please see the Call for Applications.

Feb
19
Fri
Conf.: Inframarginalism & Internet — Lexington, Kentucky or Online
Feb 19 all-day
Conf.: Inframarginalism & Internet -- Lexington, Kentucky or Online

The University of Kentucky Rosenberg College of Law, with support from John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, will host Inframarginalism & Internet: A Conference on the Redistribution of Wealth between Buyers and Sellers on the Internet and the Consequences for our Political and Economic Constitutions on February 19, 2021.

For more information, please see the conference website.