Calendar

Jan
31
Fri
Jan 31 all-day

INDEX JOURNAL is is accepting submissions for Issue No. 2 LAW. The editors invite essays and criticism that interrogates the themes of law and justice in works of art, be it in Australian history or the contemporary world.

Papers should be no more than 7,500 words and in accordance with the Chicago Manual of Style. Submit to editors@index-journal.org

Deadline for submission is 31 January 2020.

CFP Deadline: Jurisprudence of Video Games & Virtual Realities
Jan 31 all-day
CFP Deadline: Jurisprudence of Video Games & Virtual Realities

Dale Mitchell, Dr. Ashley Pearson, and Dr. Timothy Peters invite submissions for their new edited collection “Playing Law: A Jurisprudence of Video Games and Virtual Realities.” The deadline for abstracts is Jan. 31, 2020. 

The edited collection continues and builds upon interdisciplinary legal scholarship which critically reads and engages law through the virtual gamespace. All submissions which use video games as a serious means of evaluating, critiquing, and explorations questions of law, legality and jurisprudence are welcome. See the attached flyer for details.

 

 

 

CFP Deadline: Street Protests in Asia-Pacific
Jan 31 all-day
CFP Deadline: Street Protests in Asia-Pacific

The Asia-Pacific Journal on Human Rights and the Law issues a call for papers for a special issue on the topic “Street Protests and Human Rights.” Please see the flyer for details. The deadline for submission is Jan. 31, 2020.

CFP Deadline: Lawyering Skills in the Doctrinal Classroom – Grand Forks, ND
Jan 31 all-day
CFP Deadline: Lawyering Skills in the Doctrinal Classroom  - Grand Forks, ND

Proposals are be sought for a Conference and Book Launch on Lawyering Skills in the Doctrinal Classroom. The Conference will be held October 2-3, 2020 at the University of North Dakota School of Law.

Join Keynote Speaker Sophie Sparrow & authors from the forthcoming collection, Lawyering Skills in the Doctrinal Classroom, for a discussion about integrating skills pedagogy into traditional doctrinal courses.

All proposals related to this general topic will be considered. Presentations should be approximately 25 minutes each. Presentations on similar topics will be grouped together in 90-minute blocks, allowing for questions at the end of each block.
Proposals should include: Presenter(s) Name(s), Institutional Affiliation, Proposed Title, and a brief (<250 words) description.

Submit proposals to Tammy Pettinato Oltz at tammy.pettinato@und.edu.

The submission deadline is January 31, 2020.

 

 

CFP Deadline: Law & Development
Jan 31 @ 12:53 pm – 1:53 pm
CFP Deadline: Law & Development

The Law and Development Institute and Bucerius Law School will co-host the 2020 Law and Development Conference in Hamburg, Germany on Nov. 6, 2020. The deadline for proposals is Jan. 31, 2020.

Registration for the 2020 Conference will be available on LDI’s website here.

Economic development is the term that has been associated with less developed countries in the Third World (“developing countries”), not the economically advanced countries (“developed countries”). However, development problems in high income countries are not less important. Changing economic conditions in recent decades caused stagnating wages and widening economic gaps among individual citizens and regions within developed countries. Stagnant economic growth deepening economic polarization and institutional incapacity to deal with these issues can be observed in several rich countries. Private law, public law, and institutions in general play a crucial role in addressing these problems. The conference addresses law and development issues relevant to high income countries on the following sub-topics.

  • Poverty and Inequality in High Income Countries and the Role of Law
  • Legal and Institutional Frameworks for Growth and Stability in High Income Countries
  • The Role of State and Development in Industrialized Countries
  • International Trade, WTO and Substitute Institutions

We ask all interested speakers to submit one-page paper abstracts by January 31, 2020. (Please indicate the relevant sub-topic in your submission.) We expect abstracts, papers, and presentations in English language.

Important Deadlines

Abstract Submission: January 31, 2020
Notification of Acceptance: February 28, 2020
Final Selection of Speakers: March 15, 2020
Full Papers Due: September 15, 2020

Please note that all conference papers will be uploaded on the conference website and will be accessible by the general public (with the attachment of appropriate copyright notice).

Selected papers will be published in Law and Development Review Special Issue in 2021.

All speakers and participants are expected to make their own travel arrangements during the conference.

Please submit your abstract and conference inquiries to Law and Development Institute (Professor Y.S. Lee) by email at info@lawanddevelopment.net

Feb
3
Mon
CFP: European Central Bank Legal Research Programme
Feb 3 all-day
CFP: European Central Bank Legal Research Programme

The European Central Bank (ECB) is seeking applications from established scholars or promising early-career researchers for up to six legal research scholarships to be awarded in 2020. The deadline for applications is Feb. 3, 2020.

Details including the application process are available on the website.

Feb
7
Fri
CFP Deadline: Biopolitics of Legal Education
Feb 7 all-day
CFP Deadline: Biopolitics of Legal Education

Thomas Giddens and Luca Siliquini-Cinelli issue a call for papers for a collection that is to be edited by them, on the topic of biopolitics of legal education.The deadline for submission is Feb. 7, 2020.

Once abstracts are confirmed the collection will be proposed to a leading publisher, initially Routledge.

CFP Deadline: csv,conf,v5 (data)
Feb 7 all-day
CFP Deadline: csv,conf,v5 (data)

The csv,conf,v5 will take place on May 13-14, 2020 in Washington D.C. The call for talk proposals is open, and the deadline for submissions is Feb. 7, 2020. 

csv,conf brings diverse groups together to discuss data topics, and features stories about data sharing and data analysis from science, journalism, government, and open source.

CFP: Book chapters, Biopolitics of Legal Education
Feb 7 all-day
CFP: Book chapters, Biopolitics of Legal Education

This is a call for written papers for a collection that is to be edited by Thomas
Giddens and Luca Siliquini-Cinelli. Once abstracts are confirmed the collection will
be proposed to a leading publisher, initially Routledge.

The deadline for submission of abstracts is February 7, 2020.

For more information, please see the Call for Papers here.

Feb
10
Mon
CFP Deadline: UN @ 75
Feb 10 all-day
CFP Deadline: UN @ 75

The Academic Council on the United Nations System (ACUNS) issues a call for papers for the 2020 Annual Meeting, with the theme: UN @ 75: The Future of Partnership and Multilateralism. The conference will be held June 25-27, 2020 at London Metropolitan University. Deadline for submissions is Feb. 10, 2020. 

CFP: Law, Technology, and Humans
Feb 10 all-day
CFP: Law, Technology, and Humans

Law, Technology, and Humans, a new international, open access, peer-reviewed journal, invites submission for its Volume 2, Issue 1.  The deadline for submission is February 10, 2020.

For more information, see the Call for Submissions.

Feb
15
Sat
CFP Deadline: Liberal Democracy and the Age of Revolution – Athens, Ohio
Feb 15 all-day
CFP Deadline: Liberal Democracy and the Age of Revolution - Athens, Ohio

The George Washington Forum on American Ideas, Politics, and Institutions, which has its home at Ohio University, invites paper proposals for a conference and subsequent edited volume on the Origins of Liberal Democracy and the Age of Revolution. The conference will be held at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio, on October 23 and 24, 2020.

Benjamin Constant famously argued that the great achievement of what we now call the Age of Revolution was “representative government” and that “this form of government, the only one in the shelter of which we could find some freedom and peace today, was totally unknown to the free nations of antiquity.” It has been commonplace ever since to claim that many of the fundamental ideas and institutions that we associate with modern representative democracy emerged from the revolutionary upheavals of the later eighteenth century.

This conference and its subsequent volume aim to look afresh at the story of liberal democracy’s origins in the Age of Revolution spanning from the Seven Years’ War to the fall of Napoleon (c. 1760–1815). Did the ideas and institutions of liberal democracy actually emerge during the Age of Revolution? If so, how and why? Were they the product of long-term developments that came to fruition during the revolutionary era? Or were they generated by and amid the conflicts, debates, and upheavals of the period itself? Given that most of the era’s revolutions and uprisings were ultimately either contained or defeated, is it justified to contend that the Age of Revolution witnessed the birth of liberal-democratic ideas and institutions? If not, then what connection is there between the revolutionary turmoil of the later eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and the eventual development of liberal democracy in the West and beyond over the next two centuries?

The organizers welcome any and all proposals that reexamine and reinterpret the connections between the Age of Revolution in the Atlantic world, c. 1760–1815, and the origins of the ideas and institutions associated with liberal democracy. All proposals—from those that closely examine specific actors, events, and writings to those that consider the era as a whole—will be given full consideration. Whether the topic is as tightly focused as the evolution of Condorcet’s ideas or as capacious as the progress and consequences of the Haitian Revolution, applicants should be clear about how their work speaks to the connections between the Age of Revolution and the origins of liberal democracy.

SUBMISSION PROCEDURE:

Proposals should include a 500-word abstract, a brief (1–2 page) curriculum vitae, and current contact information. Please send proposals to both conference organizers by February 15, 2020:
Dr. James M. Vaughn, George Washington Forum, Ohio University (jmvaughn@ohio.edu).
Dr. Robert G. Ingram, Department of History, Ohio University (ingramr@ohio.edu).

Read the full call here.

CFP Deadline: Legal Education and International Students – Brno, Czech Republic
Feb 15 all-day
CFP Deadline: Legal Education and International Students - Brno, Czech Republic

The Working Group on International Students and Law Schools will host a conference on the topic of Legal Education and International Students at Masaryk University Faculty of Law in Brno, Czech Republic on June 25-26, 2020.

A Code/Charter of Best Practice in International Legal Education?
Is it possible? Is it desirable? What would even be included?

This two-day conference will focus on what might be the best practices/approaches in legal education when a law school/faculty includes non-domestic law students (international or foreign law students). The first day will be devoted to panel/poster presentations on the many different issues/challenges/ approaches/solutions arising for the international students, local students, academics and institutions.

The second day will focus on what might be needed to develop an aspirational Charter or Code of Best Practice for Legal Education of International Students.  The result or conclusions of that second day would then be circulated to those not in attendance at the conference (mainly law schools/faculties around the world) for their input.  Depending on the conference results and the later input on any results the Working Group will then reconvene to continue the development of a Code/Charter.  The ideal and eventual goal would be to produce and disseminate such a Code/Charter to which law schools/faculties could aspire.

Suggested Topics:

Language issues (comprehension, instruction, accent, writing, oral, etc.)

Admissions (language, tests, visas, etc.)

Academic success (attrition, assessments, supports, etc.)

Personal success (mental health, socialisation, financial wellbeing, etc.)

School administrative issues (recruitment, admin supports, relation to budgets, etc.)

Cultural issues (legal cultural, academic culture, popular culture, etc.)

Substantive issues (curriculum, foundations, specialisations, legal practice, etc.)

Pedagogical issues (participation, interaction with local students, academic misconduct, etc.)

Macro issues (cost/benefits, country/region source or destination, legal tradition specific, etc.)

Teacher/instructor issues (training, cultural conflicts, supports, etc.)

Language issues (comprehension, instruction, accent, writing, oral, etc.)

Admissions (language, tests, visas, etc.)

Academic success (attrition, assessments, supports, etc.)

Personal success (mental health, socialisation, financial wellbeing, etc.)

School administrative issues (recruitment, admin supports, relation to budgets, etc.)

Cultural issues (legal cultural, academic culture, popular culture, etc.)

Substantive issues (curriculum, foundations, specialisations, legal practice, etc.)

Pedagogical issues (participation, interaction with local students, academic misconduct, etc.)

Macro issues (cost/benefits, country/region source or destination, legal tradition specific, etc.)

Teacher/instructor issues (training, cultural conflicts, supports, etc.)

All proposals must be submitted to cpicker@uow.edu.au by 15th February 2020. The conference committee will then consider proposals and do its best to inform those invited to present by 15th March 2020.

Fore more information, visit the conference website.

 

Feb
17
Mon
CFP – Human Trafficking and Smuggling
Feb 17 all-day
CFP - Human Trafficking and Smuggling

Forced Migration Review issue 64 – to be published in June 2020 – will include a feature on human trafficking and smuggling. The deadline for submission of articles is February 17, 2020.

Please see the Call for Papers.

CFP Deadline: Climate Crisis and Local Communities
Feb 17 all-day
CFP Deadline: Climate Crisis and Local Communities

The Forced Migration Review is seeking article submissions for its June 2020 issue, entitled Climate Crisis and Local Communities.

This issue will focus on grassroots action by affected communities in prevention, adaptation, mitigation, resilience, preparedness, response, governance and decision-making, campaigning and advocacy. Many countries and communities have been coping with the effects of a changing climate for decades, and have much experience to share. This feature theme will explore how their learning can inform and support other affected communities and the international community in their approaches, policies and actions.

The Review is looking for concise, pertinent, practice-oriented, challenging articles that present analysis, lessons and good practice with wide relevance. In particular, the FMR Editors are looking for submissions (from affected communities, advocates, practitioners, policymakers, researchers and climate specialists) that reflect a diverse range of experience and opinions and that address questions.

The full list of topics/questions can be found on the Review’s website, at: https://www.fmreview.org/climate-crisis-local.

IMPORTANT: Please do not propose articles on climate change-related aspects that fall outside the scope of the provided questions. There will be a follow-up FMR issue on ‘climate crisis and global response’ in June 2021 – look out for that call for articles in late 2020. Please also avoid an overly descriptive approach in your article – set the context but focus on the analysis, lessons, voices, recommendations, etc.

BEFORE WRITING YOUR ARTICLE: If you are interested in contributing, please email the Editors at fmr@qeh.ox.ac.uk with a few sentences about your proposed topic so that we can provide feedback and let you know if we are interested in receiving your submission.  

WHEN WRITING/SUBMITTING YOUR ARTICLE: Please read our guidelines for authors and ensure your article, when submitted, complies with our submission checklist: www.fmreview.org/writing-fmrWe do not accept articles that do not comply with our checklist.

  • Maximum length: 2,500 words
  • Deadline for submission of articles: Monday, February 17, 2020
Feb
21
Fri
CFP Deadline: Sexual Politics of Freedom
Feb 21 all-day
CFP Deadline: Sexual Politics of Freedom

The Irish Centre for Human Rights at the National University of Ireland, Galway will host the conference The Sexual Politics of Freedom, an interdisciplinary post-colonial conference on sex, gender, politics, and freedom from May 22-23, 2020. Proposals are now being accepted; the deadline for submissions is Feb. 21, 2020. 

Feb
28
Fri
CFP Deadline: Elon L. Rev.
Feb 28 @ 12:55 am – 11:45 pm
CFP Deadline: Elon L. Rev.
The Elon Law Review issues a call for papers for the 2020 Symposium – Access to the Ballot on the Eve of the 2020 Election: What Barriers Still Exist?. The deadline for abstracts is Feb. 28, 2020. 
The Elon Law Review Symposium will be held Friday, Sep, 25, 2020, at Elon
University School of Law in Greensboro, North Carolina.
See flyer for details. Contact: Samantha Dudley & Tori Ford, Symposium Editors (sdudley2@elon.edu & vford@elon.edu)
CFP Deadline: Genocide & Law: Visual Arts & Language
Feb 28 @ 8:49 pm – 9:49 pm
CFP Deadline: Genocide & Law: Visual Arts & Language

The Institute of Linguistics at Adam Mickiewicz University together with the International
Roundtables for the Semiotics of Law, CRDP – équipe René Demogue, Lille University
(France) will host the 21st International Roundtables for the Semiotics of Law & 15th Conference on Legal Translation and Interpreting and Comparative Legilinguistics (Legal Linguistics) on the topic Genocide and Law – Communicating Through Visual Arts and Language, June 26-28, 2020. For more information see this site. The deadline for abstracts is Feb. 28, 2020. 

Feb
29
Sat
Call for Topics Deadline: Frankenlaw – Critical Legal Conference 2020 – Dundee, United Kingdom
Feb 29 all-day
Call for Topics Deadline: Frankenlaw - Critical Legal Conference 2020 - Dundee, United Kingdom

The Critical Legal Conference 2020 will be held at the University of Dundee on September 3-5, 2020. The conference theme is Frankenlaw.

Dundee had an embryonic role in the creation of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein. Approaching the northern fringes of the United Kingdom, Dundee’s ‘eyry of freedom’ helped shape the imaginary that would result in Shelley’s famous text, and the infamous and unnatural conglomeration that it unleashed upon the world. Shelley’s reconstituted monster, created by Dr Frankenstein in his experimentations with the fringes of life, has become a cultural icon from page to stage to screen, and beyond. In taking it as inspiration for the theme of the Critical Legal Conference 2020, Frankenstein’s monster is reformulated as a rich and productive concept that encounters many of the multiple and profound tensions of modern law.

Frankenstein’s monster is typically characterised by the joining together of dead parts to constitute a reanimated whole, brought (back) to life by the power of modern science. As a conceptual figure, it thus becomes a notion of both unity and separation, of life and death, and of the power of reason to structure and animate otherwise individual and decaying parts. Rendered as a form of law—as a Frankenlaw—it conjures questions of detachment and community, of touching and separation, of independence and being bound, of unity and corporation, of the rational resolution of multiplicity—and of the modern social order: a divided whole, a community of atomistic modern subjects under a single, sovereign hierarchy.

Partaking in critical legal studies at Dundee, in the temporal shadow of Mary Shelley’s nascent imagination, it seems appropriate to let the theme of Frankenlaw permeate our reflections. To think with Frankenlaw is to encounter questions of corporate personhood, of the relationship between life and science, of bodies and their parts, of post-state or post-sovereign modes of power, of law as dead things (texts, buildings, victims) compiled and brought to life in different ways, of the possibility of unifying plurality, of community and modern subjecthood. It is an invitation and an opportunity to construct new concepts and modes of legal thought out of dead and useless ones, to animate our encounters with law in controversial and provocative ways, to seek to go beyond the boundaries of reason and modernity and see what we find.

Huddled around the thought of law, the dark of the uncritical creeping in, we shall make ghost stories of our own—we shall conjure for one another our own terrifying and inspiring visions … of Frankenlaw!

To propose a stream , please submit the following to CLC2020@dundee.ac.uk by 29 February 2020:

  • A 200 to 300 word abstract or outline of your proposed stream
  • Names and affiliations of the stream’s convener(s)
  • A single email address for the communicating convener
  • The email address to be used for paper submissions (if different from above)
  • You are welcome to propose a stream in an alternative or non-traditional format. Include brief details of your proposed format and any requirements alongside your abstract.

A PDF form is available here, to use if you wish.

Any queries or information, contact: CLC2020@dundee.ac.uk

For more information visit the website.

CFP Deadline: Munich Summer Institute – Munich, Germany
Feb 29 all-day
CFP Deadline: Munich Summer Institute - Munich, Germany

The Center for Law & Economics at ETH Zurich, the Chair for Technology and Innovation Management at TUM, the Chair for Economics of Innovation at TUM, the Institute for Strategy, Technology and Organization at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition  will jointly organize the fifth Munich Summer Institute. The Institute will be held June 2-4, 2020 at the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities in Munich, Germany.

The Summer Institute will focus on three areas:

  • Digitization, Strategy and Organization (chairs: Jörg Claussen and Tobias Kretschmer),
  • Innovation and Entrepreneurship (chairs: Dietmar Harhoff, Joachim Henkel and Hanna Hottenrott),
  • Law & Economics of Intellectual Property, Innovation & Digitization (chair: Stefan Bechtold)

The goal of the Munich Summer Institute is to stimulate a rigorous in-depth discussion of a select number of research papers and to strengthen the interdisciplinary international research community in these areas. Researchers in economics, law, management and related fields at all stages of their career (from Ph.D. students to full professors) may attend the Munich Summer Institute as presenters in a plenary or a poster session, as discussants or as attendants. The Munich Summer Institute will feature three keynote lectures, 18 plenary presentations and a daily poster session (including a poster slam). The Munich Summer Institute focuses on quantitative empirical research.

Participation is by invitation only. The organizers will fund travel and hotel expenses for all plenary speakers and hotel expenses for all poster presenters and invited discussants.

Paper submissions are due February 29, 2020.

More information is available on the Institute’s website.